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advanced photoshop
Aug
13

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3

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Tips & Tutorials, by Anna-lisa Saywell

Artists in the industry share their secrets to using Photoshop in order to enhance their illustrations, which range from editorial work to packaging and high profile advertising

See part 1 of these awesome tips at blog.advancedphotoshop.co.uk/tutorials/15-illustration-tips-and-tricks-part-1

Or, see part 2 at https://blog.advancedphotoshop.co.uk/?p=10287

11 – Sketch with Wacom

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3

Wanchana Intrasombat, aka Vic, created a series of character designs for a project entitled Life. One is a mischievous boy scout on a trip with his classmates: “All my paintings and illustrations are done with Photoshop and a Wacom Intuos. It’s the main tool that I use to create images and I just used the normal Brush tool for this one. I also use the standard brush to sketch, and sometimes create my own brushes for specific projects. For me, the Brush is the most important tool in Photoshop; I use it for all my drawing and painting as though it was a traditional tool. It’s similar to using real pencils and brushes.

 

12 – Add noise

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3
 

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3

Vicente Garcia Morillo was given a brief for Converse’s Pro Leather campaign: “It was about presenting a graphic interpretation of the Converse logo based on concepts relating to the urban street culture. Here, I represented basketball; another design was created for hip-hop. Once I got the concept, I did sketches of the composition on paper for the client. After the concept was approved I started to develop the digital phase. I created all the vector elements in Adobe Illustrator and then imported these into Photoshop. Here I applied the Noise filter, which helps to provide a uniform aspect and give the artwork some vibration.

13 – Illustrate in 3D

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3

Working to a brief to create four characters in a detailed environment under the heading of Mercenaries, Sasha Vinogradova choose a funny and quirky style: “The first step was character design and deciding how my characters would look. Next I made a rough sketch of compositions, colours and lights and then created my scene and 3D models in 3DS Max and ZBrush. I set up lights and materials in a 3D scene then rendered my image. After that I added details such as eyes, grass and hair and added some post-production edits, like adding air perspective, or colour and contrast correction. I used Photoshop to create all the sketches and textures for elements such as the scarf. I also added some details in post-production. When you start creating an image, try to keep the final result as clear as you can in your mind and never ignore composition. When I create a piece I love to add details, but if you start adding them too soon without keeping the entire image in mind then you risk losing the integrity of your image. Finding your favourite artists and researching all their work is a great way to improve your own.

14 – Preserve your traditional feel

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3

Mitchell Nelson was approached by California-based publisher Devious Publications to create a new logo that was quirky and unique, and that had to tell a story which reflected classical and vintage qualities: “I drew the whole illustration with pencils and then scanned this into Photoshop for post-production and retouching. Subtlety is the key; I try to remember why I start with pencil in the first place and enhance its qualities rather than destroy them. However, if you are after a highly digital piece but still mix with traditional media, strong contrasts of the two can give some very interesting and contemporary looks.”

15 – Colour with Colour Overlay

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3
 

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3
 

15 Illustration Tips and Tricks: Part 3

Yana Beylinson, principal of Liquid Pixel Studios, took the vision of a family-owned business and turned it into packaging for their range: “Casacao is a family-owned producer of organic cocoa beans, nibs and powder. The farm is located in the Dominican Republic, with its headquarters in New York. The initial brief had multiple references to the organic nature of the business and admiration of the beauty and health benefits of cacao plants. Photoshop was a cornerstone of the process, as it is for all my illustration and pattern work. After the drawing is scanned in, the entire process of rendering, separating the elements and colouring is done in Photoshop. The pattern is also created in Photoshop, with careful attention paid to detail and the placement of elements. Each element, such as the outline or silhouette of a bean, is cleaned and placed in a separate layer. One simple plant illustration can use up to 10 layers. I use the Color Overlay (in the Layer Style menu) technique to colour each layer; it’s the most time-effective and easy-to-change method. For pattern creation I duplicate each plant, create a layer group for each, and then try different positioning. The resulting raw files are very large; I usually create flattened TIFF files to be used for actual production.

  • Making any scene creative needs a very good knowledge on designing through illustration. Some helpful ideas I get from this tutorial also. Thank you for your effort.