advanced photoshop
Jan
27

Advanced Photoshop 79 on sale now

Posted in:
, by Julie Bassett

In this month’s issue…

Advanced Photoshop 79 on sale now

In this month’s issue…

  • Creative designs – Design our cool cover robo-bug with the in-depth expert tutorial
  • Editorial illustration – Insider advice from designers and artists working in this lucrative sector of the industry
  • 100% Photoshop – Master the art of concept design using nothing more than the tools and features of Photoshop
  • Interview: Depthcore collective – We speak to one of the most influential design collectives on the planet

Creative designs

Advanced Photoshop 79 on sale nowIn this tutorial we’ll learn how to effectively combine a large number of elements into one convincing scene by carefully blending them together using a variety of Photoshop tools and techniques. In addition we’ll explore ways to use brush presets to achieve more random, organic-looking features that will help bring life to our robo-bug image.

In order to create a truly cohesive end result we’ll focus the majority of our attention on lighting, shading and details that will really help sell the final image. You should have fairly good knowledge of basic Photoshop features such as the Transform tool, layer masks, blending options and of managing layers.
This workshop is based on several popular designs that fuse organic creatures with mechanical parts. These types of projects are great for fine-tuning your skill to blend images together and, more generally, can be an ideal opportunity to push your imagination.

(Read more in issue 79 of Advanced Photoshop magazine…)

Editorial illustration

Advanced Photoshop 79 on sale nowYou might think editorial illustration is constrained by certain rules and conventions, predetermined by clients and established templates. However the boom of various digital formats is redefining the terms.

Common sketch-based art is matched with richer visual devices and a multitude of illustrative styles are employed – cartoon, mixed media, graphic design and super-digital methods are all acceptable. However, there’s still a great respect for the original art forms, with digital styles often replicating traditional application.

One tradition that certainly hasn’t changed is the impact such imagery serves. Cover art still needs to entice readers to pick up a book or magazine, with artists needing to present a product or brand’s attitude and persona in one compact visual – no easy feat. All editorial artwork is used to capture the personality and character of the publication, piquing consumers’ interest and whether it’s worthy enough for them to pick up and, ultimately, buy. In this feature, Advanced Photoshop once more delves into what defines current commercial standards, delivering you in-depth industry advice to give you a head-start in your own editorial design career.

(Read more in issue 79 of Advanced Photoshop magazine…)

100% Photoshop

Advanced Photoshop 79 on sale nowIn this tutorial we will show you how to create a stunning concept vehicle design in 2D using only Photoshop. Many current concept vehicle designs rely heavily upon 3D rendering programs. However, by using some fundamental Photoshop tools, we will demonstrate that you can create stunning and realistic concept designs in 2D quite proficiently.

In particular, we will be relying on key principles of lighting and form to achieve realism and a high level of detail. We will also make significant use of the Smudge tool, primarily using a single brush to apply a wide variety of high and lowlights to really make our design pop. Finally, we will utilise Photoshop’s layering capacity and work with various filter combinations to achieve some great overall lighting effects.

Because a considerable chunk of this Masterclass is illustration-based, you will need to rely heavily upon your own intuition, creativity and talent. We recommend that you take some time and experiment with the techniques outlined, as there may be different ways to get similar or even better results. Some of the techniques described in this tutorial will be a little easier if you own a graphics tablet, but all of them should be obtainable with the use of a mouse and your own artistic ingenuity.

(Read more in issue 79 of Advanced Photoshop magazine…)

Interview: Depthcore collective

Advanced Photoshop 79 on sale nowDepthcore, the internationally recognised art collective focused on modern and abstract art, began with one man – its founder, freelance illustrator and art director, Justin Maller (www.justinmaller.com). It was his visionary idea back in 2000 that saw the birth of what was to become one of the groundbreaking online art movements of the 21st Century. Some may argue with such a view, but in a time when gothic themes were prevalent, it was Maller who bucked the trends and established a new order in the digital design arena.

Maller began his own venture into digital art by experimenting in our favourite app. Scanned photos, a shedload of filters and, he confesses, a bunch of “bad taste” led to Maller establishing another premier art community, deviantART (www.deviantart.com). “I was pretty much immediately ensnared by the community; at the time, dark art was en vogue and there were a couple of art groups – Breed and Raster most notably – which had formed and were releasing online exhibitions featuring the best guys in that genre,” he explains. “I was enamoured of the idea; a private online art club? I like private. I like art. I like online. Sign me up.” However, his enthusiasm soon turned to disappointment, as he found that his own focus on style was extremely different to the ‘in fashion’ types – Maller was practising with super-digital abstract work, which he admits wasn’t quite up to scratch at that given time. “Neither of the established art groups were especially keen to have me involved. So I sent out an email to ten or so prominent abstract guys in the community asking if they were interested in forming a new collective; the answer was a resounding ‘yes’ from everyone, and so we dug down and got to work on our first release, which went live in June 2001.”

(Read more in issue 79 of Advanced Photoshop magazine…)